What Is There to Do in Aruba at Night (Drinking, Eating, and Gambling)?

Aruba, one of the Caribbean’s darling is undoubtedly one of the best places to be on this side of the Antilles. With inclusive drinking and gambling laws, several casinos, good food, and an even interesting mix of drinks, Aruba keep proving itself, it is worth the expense.
What Is There to Do in Aruba at Night
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Nestled near the Latin American world, right at the Caribbean sea, and influenced by the Dutch, you’ll expect that the island nation’s nightlife is as interesting as its cultural mix. Aruba has a slew of casinos, bars and restaurants, and luxury resorts that seem to have everything to offer at every guests’ whim.

Is Aruba Safe at Night?

Often considered as the safest of all Caribbean islands, Aruba is generally safe for both locals and tourists. However, crime still exists in Aruba, just like any part of the world, but the island nation has been seeing low crime rates for years and it has helped boost the economy.

With low crime rates, comes better living conditions, with Aruba’s beauty and its quality living conditions it has been an enticing island for Caribbean-loving tourists. At night, the streets are generally safe for tourists to walk around, but it is mainly discouraged, especially around secluded areas.

While Aruba may be considered safe for the most part, it is best to not let your guard down wherever you go. The crime rate may be consistently low for so long, petty, smaller crimes still happen to tourists, so it’s best to be cautious.

Is It Safe to Walk Around Aruba at Night?

Walking around in Aruba can be pretty risky depending on where you are, if you walk along the resort row on Palm Beach where there are mostly tourists, you can be safe. But, secluded and dodgy areas deep within the city streets are particularly discouraged.

Although considered as the safest Caribbean island, petty crime, sometimes even violent crime can still happen in Aruba at night. So, it’s best to err on the side of caution when walking around, and not just on Aruba.

Is Aruba a Party Island?

The entire stretch of the Caribbean is one big party hotspot and Aruba is not an exception. While it may not have a grand party scene as big as St. Lucia, Jamaica, and Barbados, famous for their carnivals and street parties. Aruba prides itself with chiller parties with a lot of live music reserved on bars and resorts, just like the Latino way.

The island boasts its more romantic and incredibly fun setting compared to its bigger party scene counterparts across the Caribbean. Aruban nightlife involves a lot of cocktails, rum, swinging, dancing, and live music.

Where Is the Party in Aruba?

Aruba’s must-visit party scene hotspots are at Palm Beach, the most happening area on the island. Bugaloes Beach Bar and Grill at De Palm Pier, famous for its happy hours full o dancing, swinging, seemingly endless flow of drinks, and just plain old fun with live music.

Another Palm Beach entry is the Gusto, with the hottest DJs on the island, a welcoming atmosphere, drinks, and all-night dancing. This bar is a stylish nightclub that offers excitement and fun, which is a must in Aruba.

What Kind of Music Do They Play in Aruba?

Aruba’s diverse population and rich origin history have made it inclusive when it comes to music. The island nation does not discriminate and is fond of representing the music of different genres, if not all of them. The island even has annual music festival s that cater to everyone’s musical tastes, from House, Techno, Underground, R&B, Hip Hop, Latin, Reggaeton, Jazz, and more.

You can expect to enjoy your own musical flavor when setting the vibe for Aruba as you will find other like-minded enthusiasts willing to share music with you. This has made Aruba an enticing locale for various music festivals like the Aruba Summer Music Festival where it headlines Grammy-winning artists, and the Aruba Soul Beach Festival held on the island’s Memorial Day.

What Do You Wear at Night in Aruba?

You can always go for a flowy, thin, ankle-length dress when going out at night, pair it up with island-themed accessories, and light make-up for that sweaty and fun night out. You can also go for a thin buttoned-down, denim shorts, and boho-chic accessories. Finish your entire look with a pair of sandals for comfortably strutting in and out of bars and restaurants.

As for men, you can always go for thin buttoned-downs, or basic plain shirts, and linen pants for a classic laid-back look. Make sure to include, watches with leather straps, and other boho-chic accessories, and maybe even an anklet for that extra attention to detail. And, finish your island look with a pair of loafers, slip-on, or sandals.

Is It Safe to Drink Alcohol in Aruba?

Being one of the safest places in the Caribbean, you can expect the same when it comes to drinking in Aruba. With laws that legalized the drinking age for 18 year-olds with beer, wine, and spirits expect that the drinking scene in Aruba might be different for countries that have drinking laws that vary widely with Aruba’s.

What Liquor Is Aruba Known for?

A liquor unique to the island is the Coecei liquor. It is a sweet red liquor made from the agave plant just like tequila, with rum then added with cane sugar. The taste is said to resemble passionfruit.

Aruba is known for its cocktail concoctions, especially the Aruba Ariba cocktail which was hailed as the island’s signature drink. This particular concoction is a mix of vodka, 151 rum, or the best rum you can find in Aruba, Coecoei liquor, pineapple juice, and grenadine poured over ice.

What Is the National Drink of Aruba?

The Aruba Ariba drink is considered to be the island’s national or signature drink. It is usually served almost everywhere from bars, resorts, and even used as a welcome drink for incoming guests to the island.

Ariba derived from the word “Arriba” meaning “up” or “upward” in Spanish, is a homage to the island’s perpetual disposition and beauty. With the island’s seemingly endless draws, windy days and awe-inspiring beauty everything on the island seems to have you feeling “up”. The Aruba Ariba drink seems to prep you up for a good time on the island.

Is Alcohol Expensive in Aruba?

Alcohol on the island is expensive especially the ones you can buy in bars, restaurants, resorts, and hotels. Sin tax has gone up in 2019 that shocked the tourists causing liquor and alcohol prices to rocket. However, there are ways you can turn this around if you’re a wise spender.

You can buy alcohol for a cheaper price in supermarkets but make sure you’re buying from local ones. Also, mini markets are great hacks for your cheaper liquor fix.

How Much Do Drinks Cost in Aruba?

A typical local beer can cost around 2.30 to 3,98 USD, and imported beers can be around 2.50 to 4.20 USD, which can be considered pricey for most. If you compare these to Cancun’s 2.14 and 3 USD respectively, it is undoubtedly more expensive.

What Is the Local Beer in Aruba?

Considered the island’s national beer, the all-malt pilsner Balashi beer is the best go-to beer in Aruba. their brewery and beer garden is even open for tours in Oranjestad, you can check out their website and book tours in advance.

How Much Does Beer Cost in Aruba?

A typical local beer can cost around 2.30 to 3,98 USD, and imported beers can be around 2.50 to 4.20 USD, which can be considered pricey for most. If you compare these to Cancun’s 2.14 and 3 USD respectively, it is undoubtedly more expensive.

What Is the Legal Drinking Age in Aruba?

With laws that legalized the drinking age for 18 year-olds with beer, wine, and spirits expect that the drinking scene in Aruba might be different for countries that have drinking laws that vary widely with Aruba’s.

Can You Drink at 16 in Aruba?

16 years old re not allowed to drink in Aruba, regardless of where you’re from. The local laws have instated that only ages 18 and above are allowed to purchase and consume liquor on the island. This is somehow a draw to liquor-loving youngsters from the US as the drinking age is 21, although laws may vary in different states.

Can You Bring Alcohol to Aruba?

As per custom regulations, you are allowed to bring alcohol and liquors in Aruba given that they follow a certain volume limitation. For wine and spirits, you can only bring a maximum of 2.25 liters, beers are around 3 liters, and 1 liter for other types of liquors.

If you want to go through customs without trouble because of the liquors and alcohol you brought, you can always buy some at the duty-free store in the airport upon arrival. Check out the Colombian Emeralds, Dufry, and Island Breeze when you arrive at the Queen Beatrix Airport.

How Do You Say Cheers in Aruba?

While one of Aruba’s predominant and official languages is Papiamento, their Latin influence still takes string when drinking. You say “Salud” when drinking with companions much like how the Latinos and Spaniards say it. “Salud” means “health” in Spanish, but it translates into “cheers” or even more so “cheers to your health”.

Expect to hear a lot of this word when you’re out drinking with the locals, as drinking culture here is quite big too. Plus, it helps you pay respect to the local culture by adhering to local customs like a simple greeting or gesture such as “Salud!”

Is the Food Good in Aruba?

A perfect mix of Caribbean, Latin American, and Dutch flavors and quirks, Aruban cuisine is top-notch and undoubtedly world-class. Aruba cuisine is characterized by having plenty of fresh fish and seafood, from its island living, fried goods, fish soups, and hearty stews that are just light and healthy.

Some of the famous traditional dishes you should try out when in Aruba are, the Pan Bati, a fluffy, sweet flatbread that tends to melt in your mouth. It is cooked the same as a pancake but eaten with a savory meal that isn’t particularly sweet, like soup.

Another notable dish is the Kashi Yena, a large ball of cheese stuffed with spicy meat, usually chicken. A Dutch-influenced meal that is often covered in Gouda, a kind of cheese famous in the Netherlands.

It isn’t Latino without “platano”, or plantain. The Aruban twist of the Latin-famous dish is the Funchi and Banana Hasa or Polenta and Fried Plantain.

Funchi is a cornmeal mush varying in shapes and sizes depending on how creative the maker wants to be and is covered with Gouda. While the plantain is often partnered with funchi as it adds richness to the taste because of the banana’s natural sweetness.

What Kind of Food do They Eat in Aruba?

With the sea as their primary source of livelihood, from beaches to its natural resources, it’s expected that Aruba has rich and flavorful seafood culture. Fried, grilled, soups, and stews are the ways many fish and other seafood are prepared in Aruba.

With the influence of the Latino American culture, there also plenty of meat, like chicken that is present in Arubans’ day-to-day cooking, like chicken. Plantains, cornmeal, mushes, and pieces of bread are also staples on the table

Dutch influence has also left its mark in Aruban cuisine like the Keshi Yena, a large cheese ball made out of Gouda, a Dutch cheese, stuffed with chicken. Dutch snacks are also present in many occasions in Aruba, like the frinkandel, bitterballen, kroket, and deep-fried cheese balls.

What Is Authentic Aruba Food?

When you’re asking for authentic Aruba food, you have to take a look at the traditional and staple ones. Check out the Pan Bati, a fluffy, sweet flatbread that tends to melt in your mouth. It is cooked the same as a pancake but eaten with a savory meal that isn’t particularly sweet, like soup.

Another notable dish is the Keshi Yena, a large ball of cheese stuffed with spicy meat, usually chicken. A Dutch-influenced meal that is often covered in Gouda, a kind of cheese famous in the Netherlands.

It isn’t Latino without “platano”, or plantain. The Aruban twist of the Latin-famous dish is the Funchi and Banana Hasa or Polenta and Fried Plantain.

Funchi is a cornmeal mush varying in shapes and sizes depending on how creative the maker wants to be and is covered with Gouda. While the plantain is often partnered with funchi as it adds richness to the taste because of the banana’s natural sweetness.

What Is Aruba National Dish?

The Keshi Yena is considered Aruba’s national dish. It’s a large ball of cheese stuffed with spicy meat, usually chicken. A Dutch-influenced meal that is often covered in Gouda, a kind of cheese famous in the Netherlands.

Does Aruba Have Coconuts?

Though not native to the island, there is coconut on the island. When resorts and other accommodation businesses, and before the island’s tourism boom, virtually, there weren’t any coconut trees on the island. Not until resorts and hotels came and imported coconut trees to add to the island spice of their resorts.

Now Aruba is speckled with coconuts, especially around the most populated areas of the island. You can even buy coconut water fresh from the coconut itself around beaches and has been a staple drink for both tourists and locals.

Is Aruba Food Expensive?

It depends on where you’re going to eat out. If you decide to eat out in restaurants, and bars, chances can be pricey. However, the average spending for food is around 22 to 54 USD per day, for all three meals, where breakfast is usually cheaper than lunch and dinner.

You have to keep in mind that food in sit-down restaurants is always more expensive than fast food or street food prices. If you manage to book an accommodation that has a functioning kitchen, you can just buy groceries and cook your own food.

But, eating ut and trying the different local dishes are recommended when coming to Aruba, just don’t splurge your entire budget on them.

How Expensive Is Food in Aruba?

If you eat out, expect that restaurant prices can range from 17 to 40 US dollars per meal per person, and meals in the local fast-food chain can cost around 8 USD per meal. Grocery shopping can be pretty pricey given that the prices of supplies and goods have higher tariffs. But it beats spending money for every meal on a famously pricey island.

Eating Out at Restaurants in Aruba Expensive?

It depends on what kind of restaurants you’re going to. However, sit-down restaurants are normally more expensive than local fast-food chains, or street food stalls. A meal per person can set you back from 17 to 40 USD dollars, with 40 USD on fancier restaurants service three-course meals.

Aruba is known for its expensive prices, so it gets you a long way to have a wider budget or a wiser spending habit. Backpackers and budget travelers have always managed to make a way around the expensive prices on the island.

Can You Bring Food to Aruba?

You can only bring well-packed, canned goods, and other items that are not spillable when flying to Aruba. However, several food items can’t be brought to Aruba like meat and meat products, and any other wet-frozen goods.

Can You Bring Frozen Meat to Aruba?

Meat and meat products are specifically not allowed to be brought into Aruba. However, if you wish to, you can only be allowed if you’ve already registered and declared to the Veterinary Service. And, on top of that, only meat coming from certain approved countries are allowed, should they declare them for transport.

What Is the Largest Casino in Aruba?

The Stellaris Casino in the newly renovated Aruba Marriott Resort is Aruba’s biggest casino at 18,000 square feet and is open for 24 hours. Its lavish interiors, exciting atmosphere, sheer size, and 24-hour access is an invitation itself to spend a few or a thousand dollars for a slim chance of winning a staggering value.

With over 500 slot machines ready and poker tables for gambling, Stellaris Casino is fancy and splurge-worthy, Vegas-style. However, if you don’t feel like gambling away your hard-earned budget, you can always enjoy live entertainment.

Does Divi Aruba Have a Casino?

The Divi Resorts in Aruba doesn’t have a casino despite being one of the biggest resorts on the island. However, Divi Aruba offers more relaxed yet upscale accommodation in Aruba. Just a walk away from the resort is the Alhambra Casino, one of Aruba’s favorite go-to casinos.

Does the Riu Palace Aruba Have a Casino?

Riu Palace Aruba proudly endorses its casino that has all the 5-star realness. The Cool Casino provides island gaming to guests of the Riu Palace as young as 18, from the classic card gambles to the hip and modern coinless gaming.

The casino was designed having different kinds of players in mind, even for slot machine lovers, and those who prefer to play along with living entertainment.

Are Casinos in Aruba Regulated?

Casinos and the enitre gamblign industry of Ariuba is regulated bythe Departamento di Asuntonan di Casino. Working under the Ministry of Justice helps keep gambling in check, as casinos do rake in staggering amounts of money, especially from gambling tourists and ex-pats.

Can You Smoke in Aruba Casinos?

In Aruba, casinos, and even bars, restaurants allow smoking. Not to be confused with smoking inside the hotel, resorts and hotels in Aruba have a strict no-smoking indoor policy, especially in suites. Hotels and resorts in Aruba have designated smoking areas or smoking rooms.

Are Drinks Free in Aruba Casinos?

Ever see those drinks in casinos in films where the protagonists just grab one from the waiter and just carry along? Apparently, you can do that too in Aruba casinos, Vegas-style. It’s best, however, to treat the waiters, waitresses, and other service workers with respect, and extra tips and they’ll fix you right up.

How Old Do You Have to Be to Gamble and Drink in Aruba?

Both the legal age for gambling and drinking in Aruba is 18 years. This may come as a shock to a lot of people coming from countries that have laws that vary from Aruba’s but this has been the case for a long time. It’s important to bring a valid ID with you just in case.

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