What Is the Best Time to Visit Curacao (Without Rain and Hurricanes)?

With warm, sunny days all year-round, and virtually no storms, visiting Curacao seems ideal any time of the year. However, despite the island’s near-perfect weather, you still need to consider other factors and conditions at the time you’re planning to visit.
What Is the Best Time to Visit Curacao
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The warm windy days of Curacao might leave so much space for exploration and fun, you still need to determine what kind of experience you want to have. From peak season price hikes to off-season promos, you need to look up just when is your ideal time to visit.

Is Curacao Tropical?

Located at the southern Caribbean Sea, situated between the islands of Aruba and Bonaire, together making up the ABC Islands, also known as the Dutch Caribbean islands. Curacao’s geographical location has given it a tropical climate with warm, sunny days and temperate waters throughout the year.

The island’s average daytime temperatures can play around 28-29 C or 82-84 F from December through February to 31 C or 88 F between May and October. The island’s seemingly perpetual sunny days can only see an average of about 70 days of rain, and average accumulated precipitation of 21.6 inches every year.

Its southern position in the Caribbean sea, and just north, off the coast of Venezuela, Curacao lies outside of the hurricane belt. While the island may experience the effects of nearby hurricanes but none too damaging – making the island and its ABC Islands sisters ideal travel destinations.

Does It Rain in Curacao?

The island’s seemingly perpetual sunny days do experience rain, especially in the months of January, July, August, and September. However, rainy months usually change from time to time, as the island doesn’t have a definite “rainy season”. But when it comes to “wet” months, where nearby hurricanes from the belt can affect the island’s weather systems are October through December.

Apart from that, the island only sees an average of about 70 days of rain, and an average accumulated precipitation of 21.6 inches every year. The months of February through June are often the driest period on the island, sometimes you won’t even experience any rain in these months.

How Often Does It Rain in Curacao?

Rain doesn’t come often in Curacao. The island can only experience an average of about 70 rain days in a year, sometimes fewer. Usually, the months that you can most likely experience rain the most are October, November, December. Curacao and the rest of the ABC Islands are known to be sunny and warm virtually throughout the year.

Is There a Rainy Season in Curacao?

Rain isn’t a common thing in Curacao. The island only experiences an average of about 70 rain days in a year, sometimes even lesser than that. Typically, the months that you can most likely experience rain the most are October through December.

These months are also called “wet” months, as it falls during the “Hurricane season” in the Caribbean. Hurrican season where nearby hurricanes from the belt up north affect the island’s weather systems causing more rain than usual. Curacao and the rest of the ABC Islands are known to be sunny and warm virtually throughout the year.

What Is the Rainy Season in Curacao?

The island and the rest of the ABC Islands don’t have an official and definite “rainy” season. The island can only experience an average of about 70 rain days in a year, or even lesser. Usually, the months that you can most likely experience rain the most are October, November, December.

You can typically experience rain during these months due to the hurricane belt cooking up weather disturbances up north, affecting the nearby islands, even though it rarely hits them directly. This is a typical experience of the rest of the Lesser Antilles, as this group of islands sits just outside the hurricane belt.

Is Curacao Windy like Aruba?

Due to its geographical location near the equator and along with the rest of the ABC Islands, can be a bit windy. Sitting side by side with Aruba and Bonaire that are famously windy, especially on certain months, trade winds can be felt in Curacao as well. However, according to past visitors, it isn’t as windy in Curacao compared to Aruba.

Curacao sits 1,348 miles or 838 km north of the equator, because of this, the island is subject to trade winds that blow through the island from the east. The winds that sweep through the island can blow an average of 20.3 mph in May-June, and 14.7 mph in October, the lowest in the year.

Is It Always Windy in Curacao?

There are certain months that winds tend to be annoying where sand can blow off on your face and tie your hair in knots, there are also months where they can be a light breeze. May through June sees the strongest winds with an average high of 20.3 mp, and August through December where they tend to die down to a breeze – with average speeds of 14.7 to 17.5 mph.

Is Curacao in the Hurricane Belt?

Just like the rest of the ABC Islands, and the Lesser Antilles, Curacao sits at the outer edge of the Hurricane Belt, where it normally doesn’t get hit directly by hurricanes nearby. However, hurricanes usually traverse near the Lesser Antilles, just a few miles up north, and can affect the weather in the region.

Aruba, Curacao, and Bonaire all enjoy a hurricane-free climate, apart from its sunny-all-year-round perks and privileges. This virtually hurricane-free weather and minimal rain make these little Dutch Caribbean islands ideal sunny getaway destinations.

Do Hurricanes Hit Curacao?

Curacao is one of the few Caribbean islands that never gets hit by hurricanes, thanks to its location outside of the hurricane belt in the Caribbean. The last hurricane that directly hit the island was in 1877, locally named Hurrican Tecla or Orkan Grandi, meaning big hurricane in Papiamento, on September 23.

This is one of the greatest things about Curacao, and the rest of the ABC Islands – no hurricanes, plus less rain, means more sun, and more fun for a lot of people, and it helps the local economy as well. This phenomenon has given the island a lot of advantages and tourists a lot to remember Curacao by.

Has Curacao Ever had a Hurricane?

So far only a small few made a close hit, but nothing too devastating, as nearby hurricanes that usually traverse north of the island cause moderate to heavy rain and strong winds. The famous hurricane that made landfall in Aruba was on September 23, 1877, locally named Hurricane Tecla or “Orkan Grandi”.

The following tropical storms and hurricanes went by a few miles north. Not directly affecting the island but caused weather systems that could potentially put people in danger, so resorts had to advise people to stay indoors.

When Was the Last Hurricane in Curacao?

The last hurricane that directly hit the island was in 1877, locally named Hurrican Tecla or Orkan Grandi, meaning big hurricane in Papiamento, on September 23.

Does Curacao Have a Hurricane Season?

The island doesn’t have a technical hurricane season per se, not even a definite rainy season, but the greater Caribbean’s hurricane season usually runs from June to November along the Hurricane Belt – that the ABC Islands are outside of.

These have given the islands, including Curacao, the ideal weather to lounge under the sun on its beaches, and do various outdoor activities. However, when hurricanes tend to manifest, they usually suck out the air that blows to Curacao making the island a lot hotter.

What Is the Best Time of Year to Go to Curacao?

The best time to visit Curacao is arguably outside of the island’s peak season, where rates and costs also, unfortunately, peak. May through November offers the ideal time to visit Curacao, budget-wise, and not so much on the weather. However, if there’s anything you would know about Curacao is that it hardly rains, and when it does it doesn’t last.

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